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20121027
20121104
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the libel make markets more transparent, stable and efficient. from george washington university law school, and this is 45 minutes. >> good morning. i am paul berman, 19 of the law school as art said and i want to welcome you to this conference and obviously welcome mary schapiro, chairman of the securities and exchange commission. so one of the things that i think makes this law school, the george washington university law school distinctive and different from other top law schools is the degree to which we are integrated into the real world of law and policy practice in this country. so one of the things we are always striving to do this not be an ivory tower academic institution solely, but also one that is always trying to engage the practicing bar, people from corporations, people who are not lawyers in the educational enterprise and also when public policy discussions. obviously we have a great advantage in being in washington d.c. and having so much access to the world of policy. but in addition, it's not just the location. it has to be your orientation as a law school. so it is som
parenthood. it didn't become law, and the government didn't shut down. you didn't have to -- >> moderator: gentlemen, i guess let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking of taking up later, but since it's on the table, congressman dold, your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes you did not break with your leaders even once, and that led the tea party to pull congress to the fringe. what is your response? dold: that was, actually, 24 votes. 20% of those votes pass with the the democratic majority. ten of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times
, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals further charges leveled yesterday. today, i want to tell you something about my world with the realities of running an institution the size and scope of penn state while dealing with widely divergent perceptions. i want to share the many wonderful activities and accomplishments of the students and faculty and staff over this agonizing year. by any reasonable definition, they are newsworthy stories. i understand that you may not be willing to listen to them until we show you how this year has changed us. what we learned about ourselves and what are we trying to do with that knowledge? i will speak candidly about how the last year affected penn state, and how the impact has gone beyond central pennsylvania to shape policies at colleges and universities across the nation. i'll share our strategies for the ye
around the world not all of the laws are the same what can you do international become and how do you see this even if we got our act really together, how do you see the cooperation developing with foreign countries and other entities and so forth? >> i think that is a rapidly evolving area because there is no good international framework right now to deal with the international aspect of cyber investigation, cyber forensics and cyber deterrence if you think of prosecution as one kind of deterrent. there are some activities going on. for example, the u.s. and the e.u. have an ongoing cyber group by the league of budapest in this month actually come and they are working for some of these issues. the regular topics of the meetings that eric holder ready and i have with our counterparts in europe and in the g6 so we are trying to develop agreements, protocols and the like that will improve the international reach in this area. but it is very a much an act in progress. >> we will take one more question because she has to leave. right here. >> i'm understand that you have to head off to the fe
funding. there was a law passed in 1933 that basically said you can only invest in companies if you're rich. this allows kind of democratizes access to investing and also democratizes for individual investors who want to invest and also those who want to access to capital for entrepreneurs. it's probably not that important or that helpful in silicon valley because there's tons of money and venture capitalists in silicon valley. it's really important in places like detroit. so now you'll have the ability next year toes, basically, put your business online, explain what you're trying to do, and people can make an investment up to $10,000 each, and if your income is a earn level, it's only up to $2,000. there are and people can raise up to a million dollars in total through this mechanism, and that will be the difference for, i think, thousands of entrepreneurs that otherwise wouldn't have been able to start a company or to have the beginnings of something, they wouldn't be able to scale the company. so i think it's an e nor pows opportunity for -- enormous opportunity for underserved
there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal government. there's actually a major law signed this summer, the bigger waters flood insurance reform act. it was designed to improve the program. it removes a lot of subsidies that the government has put into the program. the goal of it is to make the program were actuarially found him a of private insurance program. >> host: "the wall street journal" this morning, the editorial, taxpayer jay louche. for those who don't have the 1960s era program offers subsidized insurance of the bull market raced to homeowners and businesses in flood prone areas and pays private insurers to administer the policy at the government accountability office put it zero so delicately lasher the program has a history of significant management challenges, including lax internal controls and outdated maps. the program has crowded out by the competition for decades, which leaves taxpayers on the hook when disaster strikes. that's "the wall street journal." "washington journal" if i could respond, i represent the independent insurance brokers of america. we
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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